Photographs & Memories

Grace. 19. Oriental.
If you know me personally..... please don't follow me, unless I follow you first.
I like to keep my Tumblr private. That's the one thing I ask.
Thank you.
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to live in this world

you must be able
to do three things
to love what is mortal;
to hold it

against your bones knowing
your own life depends on it;
and, when the time comes to let it go,
to let it go.

—   Mary Oliver (via observando)

(via saidreadheard)

breakfastburritoe:

do you ever get second hand happiness like someone is happy so you’re happy bc they’re happy

(via anditslove)

(Source: mariannapaige, via anditslove)

Just finished Eleanor & Park.

WHAT KIND OF AN ENDING WAS THAT.
IM SO ANGRY.
I hate when books end so vaguely. GOD.
THIS IS STUPID. UGH.
I hate finishing books.

“Nobody will protect you from your suffering. You can’t cry it away or eat it away or starve it away or walk it away or punch it away or even therapy it away. It’s just there, and you have to survive it. You have to endure it. You have to live through it and love it and move on and be better for it and run as far as you can in the direction of your best and happiest dreams across the bridge that was built by your own desire to heal.”

—   Cheryl Strayed, Tiny Beautiful Things (via creatingaquietmind)

(Source: quotethat, via anditslove)

vv0lf:

chezphoto:

this week’s hair color is brought to you by sunsets after a week of rain in june

Wow what this is amazing

(via anditslove)

itsgayerinenochian:

mingdliu:

Do you ever get like super vulnerable late at night that you just want to spill your heart out and say how you feel because you’ve been holding it in for so long and you just need some ventilation and there’s just something about two in the morning that makes me lose my filter and say the things I would never have the guts to say when the sun is up.

the nights were mainly made for saying things that you can’t say tomorrow day

(via anditslove)

“Your only problem, perhaps, is that you scream without letting yourself cry.”

—   Friedrich Nietzsche, Selected Letters (via mjalt)

(Source: hellanne, via anditslove)

aseaofquotes:

Thornton Wilder, The Bridge of San Luis Rey

aseaofquotes:

Thornton Wilder, The Bridge of San Luis Rey

(via aseaofquotes)

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.
Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.
Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.
Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.
The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

(via teachingliteracy)

explore-blog:

For Raymond Chandler's birthday today, his collected wisdom on writing from a lifetime of letters

explore-blog:

For Raymond Chandler's birthday today, his collected wisdom on writing from a lifetime of letters

(via teachingliteracy)

“I think the hardest person to love is yourself.”

—   (via acceptvnce)

(Source: ximperfectxperfectionistx, via violentscene)

aseaofquotes:

— Paulo Coelho

aseaofquotes:

— Paulo Coelho

“I loved being with you and seeing you and you were real and right there and I could touch you and it was really happening and it was finally happening and I could look over and grab your hand and it was amazing and wonderful and I can’t get it out of my head.”

—   (via shiro13)

(via anditslove)

troylerisinyou:

i guess you learn something new every day

(via troyesivan)